Andrew Bull

Andrew Bull

Andrew Bull has been in business for over 25 years. His work is based around small figures and animals depicting the lighter side of life. Each piece is handmade in porcelain, being fired three times, firstly in a bisque, a glaze and finally a lustre firing. Originally inspired by Heath Robinson cartoons Triple Decker Bus and Two Wheel Car , the figures have now evolved into their current form. His interest in ceramics started at the age of nine when attending saturday morning classes in Grimsby. Following a foundation course he attended a three year ceramics course at Rochester college of art and design in Kent. As Andrew's work is understandably very popular, sometimes we do not have everything in stock, but can always get one to you as soon as we can.

P&P per item £7 (reduction for multiplies)

Lea Phillips

Lea Phillips

Lea worked at Dartington Pottery for two and a half years before opening her own workshop in Totnes. Her work is based on thrown stoneware pieces which she decorates with strong, rhythmic abstract designs, often suggesting sea or sky - movement and energy. She is fascinated in the exploration of creativity and science, and the development of new glazes, requiring a mixture of experimentation and close observation over time.

Rob Whelpton

Rob Whelpton

Rob’s pieces go through a Raku firing process that means each piece, like a fingerprint, is entirely unique.Raku firing is an ancient Japanese technique. It encourages hairline cracks to appear in the surface of the glaze by subjecting the pots to extreme changes of temperature during the firing process, and immersing them in sawdust, giving an amazing sense of texture. When the pots are at a very high temperature and the glaze has melted they are taken out of the kiln and thrown (gently!) into a metal container filled with sawdust. The heat of the pots quickly sets the sawdust alight at which point the container is closed. Once the fire uses up all of the oxygen it starts to draw it out of the clay, which is when tiny cracks begin to trace their way randomly across the surface of the pot, leaving unglazed areas blackened. Pots are further enhanced after firing by the use of gold leaf. The vivid colours and textures of Rob’s work give it a raw and intense feel.

Linda Styles

Linda Styles

Linda's work is instantly recognisable. Her pieces are hand built, multi layered and multi fired - often up to 7 times - superficially naïve, and sometimes gloriously dysfunctional in the tradtional sense. The viewer/handler is invited to respond on an emotional level as opposed to intellectual level. She has exhibited in the V&A Museum and designed for Terence Conran. Lecturing at Falmouth College of Art, we are very privileged to have this highly acclaimed ceramicist exhibiting here at Oriel-y-Felin.

Dan Wright

Dan Wright

Dan produces hand thrown earthenware pieces, which are covered in white and coloured slips and hand drawn transfers screen printed in black enamels. He is inspired by English slipware and 1950s Ridgeware ceramics, particularly the homeware range. He has also been influenced by the Italian designer P. Fornasetti. He produces work that relates to either function of the object or the locality of the area. He likes to combine traditional and modern techniques in a contemporary way. Dan has exhibited nationally and internationally, and at the Royal College of Art.

Hilary Bellamy

Hilary Bellamy

After five years studying at SDerby College of Art and a teaching career, Hilary is concentrating exclusively on sculpture in her Darley Abbey studio. Intrigued by the elusive hares she sees on local walks she photographs and sketches them, also using the stuffed animals and birds at Calke Abey, as a rich source of information. This collection of birds focussed attention on their feather structure and inspired studies of roosters. Their vanity and ostentatious display has led to a series of sculptures embellished by bright glazes and metallic effects. Each piece is fired to 1040 degrees C and decorated using under glazes, glazes and metallic oxides. Gold is also sometimes applied. Her work is time consuming and each piece is totally unique.

Catherine Rich

Catherine Rich

Having read English Literature at Bristol and teaching at Cambridge, Catherine developed her love of decoratve arts. On meeting Pemrokeshire ceramicist, Simon Rich, she applied this to ceramics using lustres of real gold, platinum and copper and mother of pearl. Her pieces are fired 4 times to produce these special effects. She is inspired in part by Gustav Klimt and symbols from the ancient world and the orient. Her work has been exhibited and collected internationally.

Jan Beeny

Jan Beeny

Cardiff based ceramicist, Jan Beeny, makes one-off slab built animals. The clay is impressed with random objects, giving a rich variety of textural effects, which is then stretched and distressed before being allowed to partially dry and then bent and folded to form the final piece.Slips and oxides then glazes stain the surface. Jan exhibits widely throughout the UK.

Julia Roxburgh

Julia Roxburgh

Julia Roxburgh’s career has taken her on an interesting path. Since graduating with a BA (Hons) Ceramics from Bristol in 1984, she went on to work as a theatrical prop maker in London, working on well-known productions such as ‘Cats’ and ‘Miss Saigon’. Her return to ceramics six years later brought with it all the fun, flamboyance and exuberance of the performance and it is still a major influence on her work today. Using white earthenware, Julia produces a wide range of domestic and interior pieces involving wheel throwing, hand-building and casting and many, many hours of decoration. This colourful slip decoration makes her work instantly recognisable. She embellishes her strong, bold forms with over-the-top baroque modelled details, vibrant patterns and glittering gilt finishes making each piece a handmade work of art. Based in Newcastle, her work is in many private collections and is available in leading stores including the prestigious Fortnum & Mason, London

Valerie James

Valerie James

I make art because I want to bring into my own visual world an idea of touching the mystery; to add a little 'something' of my soul's journey  through life, to make the invisible, visible. The main themes for my work come from Archetypes, Dreams, Mythology, Symbolism and Nature. I trained in painting and sculpture at UCW Aberystwyth, I have, in the last ten or so years, been working with the wonderful plasticity of clay, a material which is so very fundamental, clay objects have survived for thousands of years, considering their brittle and fragile nature this alone is a small miracle. With the addition of 'fire' to provide the transforming flux anything can happen! I use stoneware and porcelain clays with underglazes, oxides, glass, and lustres. My 'Madonna' series of works make great use of mixing underglaze colours with clear or thin white layers of glaze which soften the colours and produce a very 'touchable' surface, soft and bone-like. I often add small areas of gold lustre to pieces to add a 'special-ness' or a ' votive' aspect to the work. This may then be enhanced with photographic decals. Making works particularly for Raku firing gives me an opportunity to step into the realms of 'chance'. I make my own glazes and use wonderful materials such as 'silver nitrate', bismuth, and copper oxides which produce metallic and volcanic surface textures complimenting the black backgrounds of soft matt smoke absorbed clay.

Richard Goodwin-Jones

Richard Goodwin-Jones

Richard is an established maker, recognised for his unique range of ceramics. He has worked solely with Raku since leaving Art College in 1984. Julie created hand-made textiles for about 15 years and also worked in arts and crafts development before joining Richard in his studio. Together they set up Goodwin-Jones Ceramics. In 2008 they moved to the beautiful pink granite coast of the Cote d’Armor region of northern Brittany.

 

Karen Williams

Karen Williams

Drawing from many sources of inspiration, least not the wild and magical county she lives in, Karen strives to create not only functional but beautiful pieces of pottery that can be used daily or even displayed as a piece of art. Her pieces are oven-proof, dishwasher-proof and freezer-proof too! Individual pottery with soul ! Every piece she makes is unique, individually hand made, slipped, drawn onto, scratched out (sgraffito) ,painted with oxides, bisque fired and finally glaze fired.

Nigel Carrick

Nigel Carrick

After working as an architect followed by community development work Nigel negotiated a 4 day week so he could go to college for one day to study ceramics. He works almost entirely in porcelain; a difficult material, fragile unfired, rock hard when fully fired and with high shrinkage and cracking. Oxides are used mixed into the porcelain which expands when fired to give textures and organic twists to the pieces and are also used as a surface colouration before final firing. His main inspiration comes from the landscape which he crosses inhis travels and in hill walking. For instance he loves the patterns of the walls, woods, clouds and villages in the snow as seen from the air or the dark fields under a brooding sky viewed from the tops of hills. Another side of his work relates to the infinite variety of strata that can be seen in rock formations. Ultimately he enjoys the link the use of clay, water, oxides and fire (or electric kiln in his case!) has with the creation of the or

Alison Fisher

Alison Fisher

Alison works in raku, creating her wonderfully tactile pieces. She lives in Pwllelli North Wales.